Five Buddha Families (Part 2)

Ever wondered what the symbols in a mandala – whether in paint or sand- represent? Who are all these tantric deities and how are they related to us, if at all? The Five Buddha Families is a tantric organizing principle for understanding who we fundamentally are – a pithy, efficient schema, that points points to original wakefulness, which like colorless light when refracted, can be utilized to better understand and recognize its subtle, different nuances and qualities. Over these three Sundays, Dr. Lye will guide us through an exploration of this organizing principle, incorporating theory, practice and contemplation into these Dharma teachings.

Five Buddha Families (Part 1)

Ever wondered what the symbols in a mandala – whether in paint or sand- represent? Who are all these tantric deities and how are they related to us, if at all? The Five Buddha Families is a tantric organizing principle for understanding who we fundamentally are – a pithy, efficient schema, that points points to original wakefulness, which like colorless light when refracted, can be utilized to better understand and recognize its subtle, different nuances and qualities. Over these three Sundays, Dr. Lye will guide us through an exploration of this organizing principle, incorporating theory, practice and contemplation into these Dharma teachings.

Songs of Milarepa (Part 14)

Milarepa was an 11th Century Buddhist poet and saint, a cotton-clad yogi who avoided the secular institutions of his time and wandered from village to village, teaching enlightenment and the path to Awakening through his spontaneously composed songs. Wherever he went, crowds of people gathered to hear his sweet sounding voice “singing the Dharma.” Milarepa exchanged a life of sin and maliciousness for one of contemplation and love, eventually reaching the ultimate state of Awakening. His thousands of extemporaneously composed songs communicate profound visions in a lyrical, simple, and lucid style.

Dorje Lopon Dr. Hun Lye offers this series on these profound vajra-songs by integrating the teachings with a vajrayāna sadhana (meditation liturgy) – The Guruyoga of Milarepa – arranged by His Holiness Drikung Kyabgön Chetsang, the supreme-head of Drikung Kagyu Lineage. Instead of the usual way of practicing the sadhana – which often emphasizes the chanting (or reading, if done in English) – Dr. Lye introduces a more contemplative and experience-based approach to practicing this sadhana.

Songs of Milarepa (Part 13)

Milarepa was an 11th Century Buddhist poet and saint, a cotton-clad yogi who avoided the secular institutions of his time and wandered from village to village, teaching enlightenment and the path to Awakening through his spontaneously composed songs. Wherever he went, crowds of people gathered to hear his sweet sounding voice “singing the Dharma.” Milarepa exchanged a life of sin and maliciousness for one of contemplation and love, eventually reaching the ultimate state of Awakening. His thousands of extemporaneously composed songs communicate profound visions in a lyrical, simple, and lucid style.

Dorje Lopon Dr. Hun Lye offers this series on these profound vajra-songs by integrating the teachings with a vajrayāna sadhana (meditation liturgy) – The Guruyoga of Milarepa – arranged by His Holiness Drikung Kyabgön Chetsang, the supreme-head of Drikung Kagyu Lineage. Instead of the usual way of practicing the sadhana – which often emphasizes the chanting (or reading, if done in English) – Dr. Lye introduces a more contemplative and experience-based approach to practicing this sadhana.

Songs of Milarepa (Part 12)

Milarepa was an 11th Century Buddhist poet and saint, a cotton-clad yogi who avoided the secular institutions of his time and wandered from village to village, teaching enlightenment and the path to Awakening through his spontaneously composed songs. Wherever he went, crowds of people gathered to hear his sweet sounding voice “singing the Dharma.” Milarepa exchanged a life of sin and maliciousness for one of contemplation and love, eventually reaching the ultimate state of Awakening. His thousands of extemporaneously composed songs communicate profound visions in a lyrical, simple, and lucid style.

Dorje Lopon Dr. Hun Lye offers this series on these profound vajra-songs by integrating the teachings with a vajrayāna sadhana (meditation liturgy) – The Guruyoga of Milarepa – arranged by His Holiness Drikung Kyabgön Chetsang, the supreme-head of Drikung Kagyu Lineage. Instead of the usual way of practicing the sadhana – which often emphasizes the chanting (or reading, if done in English) – Dr. Lye introduces a more contemplative and experience-based approach to practicing this sadhana.

Songs of Milarepa (Part 11)

Milarepa was an 11th Century Buddhist poet and saint, a cotton-clad yogi who avoided the secular institutions of his time and wandered from village to village, teaching enlightenment and the path to Awakening through his spontaneously composed songs. Wherever he went, crowds of people gathered to hear his sweet sounding voice “singing the Dharma.” Milarepa exchanged a life of sin and maliciousness for one of contemplation and love, eventually reaching the ultimate state of Awakening. His thousands of extemporaneously composed songs communicate profound visions in a lyrical, simple, and lucid style.

Dorje Lopon Dr. Hun Lye offers this series on these profound vajra-songs by integrating the teachings with a vajrayāna sadhana (meditation liturgy) – The Guruyoga of Milarepa – arranged by His Holiness Drikung Kyabgön Chetsang, the supreme-head of Drikung Kagyu Lineage. Instead of the usual way of practicing the sadhana – which often emphasizes the chanting (or reading, if done in English) – Dr. Lye introduces a more contemplative and experience-based approach to practicing this sadhana.

Songs of Milarepa (Part 10)

Milarepa was an 11th Century Buddhist poet and saint, a cotton-clad yogi who avoided the secular institutions of his time and wandered from village to village, teaching enlightenment and the path to Awakening through his spontaneously composed songs. Wherever he went, crowds of people gathered to hear his sweet sounding voice “singing the Dharma.” Milarepa exchanged a life of sin and maliciousness for one of contemplation and love, eventually reaching the ultimate state of Awakening. His thousands of extemporaneously composed songs communicate profound visions in a lyrical, simple, and lucid style.

Dorje Lopon Dr. Hun Lye offers this series on these profound vajra-songs by integrating the teachings with a vajrayāna sadhana (meditation liturgy) – The Guruyoga of Milarepa – arranged by His Holiness Drikung Kyabgön Chetsang, the supreme-head of Drikung Kagyu Lineage. Instead of the usual way of practicing the sadhana – which often emphasizes the chanting (or reading, if done in English) – Dr. Lye introduces a more contemplative and experience-based approach to practicing this sadhana.